benefits of continuity

image1

Reduction in prematurity rates

Better Births (2016) found that women who experienced continuity of carer were 24 per cent less likely to experience pre-term birth.

Reduction regional analgesia

Sandall et al (2016) found that women who received continuity were less likely to have epidurals in labour, and were more likely to achieve vaginal births. 

Reduction in stillbirth rates

Women who received care in a continuity model were 19 per cent less likely to lose their baby before 24 weeks (Dunkley-Bent, 2018 Better Births, 2016; )

Reduction in induction rates

Continuity of carer leads to women's involvement in informed decision making. When women receive care from a known midwife, she is less likely to be induced and therefore more likely to achieve a normal birth. 

Increased maternal satisfaction

Perriman, Davis & Ferguson (2018) found that women had higher levels of satisfaction in personalised care, trust and empowerment are achieved in the continuity of midwifery model of care.

Increased Breastfeeding rates

With a named midwife, women receive more support with infant feeding, leading to higher initiation of breastfeeding and continued breastfeeding at 28 days of life (Homer et al, 2017). 






References


Care Quality Commission (2018) Maternity services survey 2017. Available from: https://www.cqc.org.uk/publications/surveys/maternity-services-survey-2017


https://www.england.nhs.uk/blog/the-importance-of-continuity-of-carer-in-maternity-services/


Sandall, J., Soltani, H., Gates, S., Shennan, A & Devane, D. (2016). Midwife-led continuity models of care compared with other models of care for women during pregnancy, birth and early parenting. Pregnancy and Childbirth Group.

Office for National Statistics (2018) Child mortality in England and Wales. Available from: https://www.ons.gov.uk/peoplepopulationandcommunity/birthsdeathsandmarriages/deaths/datasets/

childmortalitystatisticschildhoodinfantandperinatalchildhoodinfantandperinatalmortalityinenglandandwales



Healthcare Quality Improvement Partnership (2018) MBRRACE-UK Perinatal Mortality Surveillance Report 2018. Available from: https://www.hqip.org.uk/resource/mbrrace-uk-perinatal-mortality-surveillancereport-2018



Homer, C., Leap, N., Edwards, N. and Sandall, J. (2017). Midwifery continuity of carer in an area of high socio-economic disadvantage in London: A retrospective analysis of Albany Midwifery Practice outcomes using routine data (1997–2009). Midwifery. 48, 1-10. Accessible from: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.midw.2017.02.009


Sandall, J., Soltani, H., Gates, S., Shennan, A & Devane, D. (2016). Midwife-led continuity models of care compared with other models of care for women during pregnancy, birth and early parenting. Pregnancy and Childbirth Group.


The 1001 Critical Days (2016) The 1001 Critical Days The Importance of the Conception to Age Two Period. Available from: https://www.1001criticaldays.co.uk/sites/default/files/1001%20days_oct16_1st.pdf


Public Health England (2018) Breastfeeding at 6 to 8 weeks after birth: 2017 to 2018 quarterly data. Available from: https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/breastfeeding-at-6-to-8-weeks-after-birth-2017-to-2018-quarterly-data